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Top Superfoods for Lowering Cholesterol

Superfoods Are High in Nutrients And May Help Lower Your Cholesterol

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Updated January 25, 2011

Written or reviewed by a board-certified physician. See About.com's Medical Review Board.

All foods provide our bodies with energy, but so-called "superfoods" have the added potential of helping protect against disease. Here are some top superfoods to lower cholesterol, plus tips on how to incorporate them into your diet.

OATMEAL

Why it's a Superfood: Whole grain oats contain cholesterol-lowering soluble fiber. Studies show that individuals with high cholesterol (over 200 mg/dl) who eat one bowl of oatmeal daily lower their cholesterol an average of 8% to 23%.

Grocery Tip: You no longer have to rely on slow-cooking varieties to get the most nutritious oatmeal. There are now many whole grain instant brands available at your local grocery store. Be sure to look for whole grain rolled oats as the first ingredient.

Preparation Tip: Sprinkle your oatmeal with ½ tsp of cinnamon for an added nutrition boost, as cinnamon appears to lower average blood glucose levels and may reduce disease-causing inflammation.

LEGUMES (Beans, Lentils and Chickpeas)

Why They're Superfoods: Legumes are excellent source of fiber and serve as a great substitute for meat in many dishes.

Grocery Tip: If you like the convenience of canned beans and legumes, but dislike the added sodium (or need to reduce sodium, per your doctor), you can easily reduce the amount of salt simply by washing the contents in a strainer under running water.

Preparation Tip: beans, lentils, and legumes are a fantastic way to add fiber to any meal and make a tasty addition to soups, stews, and salads. You can add a ¼ teaspoon paprika and cayenne to hummus (ground chickpeas) for a zesty nutrient bonus.

AVOCADO

Why it's a Superfood: Don't let the total fat grams in avocado scare you. The fat found in avocado is mostly "good" fat. Research shows that regular avocado consumption can help decrease your total cholesterol and increase for HDL ("good" cholesterol).

Grocery Tip: "Should I purchase a ripe or non-ripe avocado?" It varies depending on the type. For Hass or Argentinean avocados: Look for all black, firm avocados with a slightly soft top. These should be used shortly after purchase. If the avocado is already soft and gives to pressure, it will likely be over-ripe by the time you prepare your dish.

Floridian/Fuerte Avocados: It is best to purchase the most firm avocado you can find, and wait several days for it to ripen before using. If you are in a hurry to ripen the avocado you can place it in a paper bag at room temperature to speed the process.

Preparation Tip: Homemade guacamole is a great complement to any meal.
Guacamole Recipes

SALMON

Why it's a Superfood: Salmon is an excellent source of omega-3 fats, a type of good fat believed to improve cholesterol -- and that many Americans don't get enough of.

Wild or Farmed? Both wild and farmed salmon contain some amount of heart-healthy omega-3. The consensus of nutrition researchers is that the benefits of consuming wild or farmed salmon, out weigh any potential risk of mercury or PCB contamination for heart health.

Preparation Tip: Cook double portions of salmon for dinner, and save half to top a delicious salad for the next day's lunch. Experiment with spicy mustards, and sliced almonds for a delicious topping.

WALNUTS

Why it's a Superfood: Walnuts contain omega-3 fatty acids.

Grocery Tip: Be sure to look for unsalted, raw walnuts, rather than mixed nut combinations, as they may contain higher sodium.

Preparation Tip: Walnuts can be easily heated when baked (350 degrees, 8 minutes), microwaved (5 minutes on medium high), or skillet cooked (3 to 5 minutes on medium high heat with light coating of olive oil). Whichever method you chose, be certain to check on and stir frequently.

Sources:

Andon M. The Oatmeal-Cholesterol Connection: 10 Years Later. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, Vol. 2, No. 1, 51-57. 2008.

Lopez LLedesma R, Frati Munari AC, Hernandez Dominguez BC, et al. Monounsaturated fatty acid (avocado) rich diet for mild hypercholesterolemia. Archives of Medical Research. Winter;27(4):519-23 1996

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