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If diet and exercise have not been successful in lowering your cholesterol, your health care provider may want to add medication to your cholesterol-lowering regimen. There are many types of cholesterol-lowering drugs on the market, and all of them work differently to reduce your "bad" cholesterol (LDL) and raise your "good" cholesterol (HDL).
  1. Statins
  2. Absorption Inhibitors
  3. Natural Supplements
  4. Omega-3 Fatty Acids
  5. Niacin

Statins

They get a lot of buzz in the news, and for good reason. Statin drugs, also known as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, are a popular family of cholesterol-lowering medications that target every aspect of the cholesterol profile.

Absorption Inhibitors

Absorption inhibitors are a newer class of cholesterol-lowering medications that prevent cholesterol from crossing the small intestine and into the bloodstream. Currently, there is only one absorption inhibitor on the market: Zetia (ezetimibe), which mainly lowers LDL cholesterol.

Natural Supplements

Are you trying to prevent high cholesterol? Would you like to avoid taking a drug to lower your mildly high cholesterol? If you answered "yes" to any of these questions, a natural alternative may help you. Before taking any of these products, be sure to consult your doctor or pharmacist, since they may interact with any other conditions you may have or medications you may be taking.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Omega-3 fatty acids are a type of unsaturated fats that are classified as an essential fatty acid, which means that they cannot be made by the body and must be obtained from the diet. Omega-3 fatty acids mainly lower triglycerides.

Niacin

Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is a blanket term that refers to nicotinic acid and its derivatives. Niacin is known for lowering bad cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as raising good cholesterol. Niacin supplements are available through prescription or over-the-counter.

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